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CiviCRM and WordPress: Four Things to Know

As CiviCRM for WordPress experts, we receive questions daily from non-profits who want to adopt an open-source CRM solution for their organizations. Whether you plan on using CiviCRM to manage memberships, event registration, or simply to collect donations, there are a number of practices that every organization, regardless of size, should adhere to when implementing …

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Using Caldera Forms CiviCRM (CFC) for Membership Registration and Donations

As of version 0.4.4 there are three new processors in CFC: Membership, Line Items and Order Processors. With these new processors you can setup forms using Caldera Form’s conditional logic and layout options, map the data to CiviCRM, and take payments using either the Stripe or Authorize.net add-on plugins. A more detailed outline of what’s …

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Using Caldera Forms CiviCRM for Multiple Contacts

When collecting information with a form on your website, you’re generally asking a single person to provide information about themselves: name, address, phone number, etc., but there are times when you need to collect information about multiple individuals to include in your CiviCRM database. For example, you may want to ask for details about parents …

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Using Caldera Form Processors to Collect CiviCRM Contact Data

Caldera Forms is already a powerful tool for creating front-end forms for your WordPress website. If you’re a nonprofit organization running CiviCRM to engage your constituents, you can also use Caldera Forms to collect and save data into your CiviCRM database. As a very simple example, Screenshot #1 is Tadpole’s basic contact form. There is …

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WordCamp Kuala Lumpur 2017

Recently, Tadpole’s Rindy Portfolio helped to organize WordCamp Kuala Lumpur, in Malaysia. Rindy relocated to KL in June 2016, and soon after linked up with the local WordPress MeetUp group run by Sam Suresh, a local technologist and WordPresser. Back in 2010, there had been a WordCamp Malaysia. But until Sam started the MeetUp group …

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